machining centers

Horizontal Machining Center Vs. Vertical Machining Center: Is a VMC or an HMC Better?

Every year, Modern Machine Shop does studies on the machine shop industry. One of the most helpful things they do is their Top Shops report, which does a detailed breakdown of the differences between what the fastest growing and most profitable machine shops are doing compared to the “average” machine shop.

 

Horizontal Machining Center Costs and Benefits

 

The top shops had higher gross sales per machine that average shop – $266,123 versus $152,000. That is huge. One of the major differences: top shops spent 10% of their gross revenues on equipment versus 2% for average shops.

 

One place that makes a difference: invest in horizontal machining centers. You probably know that a horizontal machining center (HMC) costs more than a vertical machining center (VMC) – but do you know that 61 percent of the “top shops” invest in HMCs – and an additional 41% of them also invest in multi-face tombstones?

 

More important: an HMC can be as productive as two or more VMCs. In fact an article written by Modern Machine Shop in 2013 called “Worth Three Machines” highlighted how one company used its HMC to do as much work as 3 VMCs.

 

Review of HMCs vs VMCs

 

HMCs cost a lot more than VMCs. How much more? The Association For Manufacturing Technology says the average HMC costs $375,000 vs. just $115,000 for the average VMC. That’s why 4 times as many VMCs are bought than HMCs every year.

 

If you look at just the cost of the machine, it might make sense to purchase a VMC, but if instead of looking at the price, you look at what you get for each dollar spent, the numbers look a little different.

 

Since very few companies pay cash for their machines, let’s look at monthly payments on HMCs Versus VMCs:

 

For an easy comparison, we’ll look at a 5-year lease on each machine, assuming your company has a good credit profile.

 

  • HMC average cost: $375,000. Average monthly lease payment: $7,050 per month
  • VMC average cost: $115,000. Average monthly lease payment: $2,250 per month
  • Difference in monthly payment: $4,800 per month

 

OK, so a HMC costs, on average, $4,800 a month more than a VMC. Yes, that’s a lot more, but the real question is:

 

Will the extra profits you reap by having that HMC be more than that $4,800 a month?

 

The key driver in machine tool utilization is spindle run time. This is where HMC’s really shine. The average spindle run time on an HMC is 85% versus 25% on a VMC. So what does that mean? That means, on average, less than a third of the labor required to make the same part.

 

Whether it makes sense to invest in the HMC depends on your business model, as obviously the savings in setup times from the HMC are more important on long runs than on short runs, but if you do any long run stuff at all, the savings are pretty apparent.

 

Figure the minimum cost of a machine operator after accounting for wages, benefits, labor burden, etc. has to be roughly $6,000 a month. Since your HMC can do the work of three VMCs, it would cost $18,000 in labor to do the same work on VMCs as you get done on HMC’s.

 

True Costs and Pricing of HMC VS VMC

 

OK, yes, the example above is a little bit simplified, but doing an apple to apples comparison, it gets us “close enough” to the info we need to make a decision. With everything else being equal:

 

An HMC costs $4,800 more per month to finance than a VMC.

Using a VMC will cost you $12,000 per month more in labor than an HMC.

All other things being equal, the HMC will save you $12,000-$4,800, or $7,200 a month.

 

Let’s repeat that: after taking into account the extra monthly cost of the HMC, it will still save you $7,200 a month in labor costs.

 

As an added bonus, more expensive equipment can typically be financed for longer period of time: on the average $375,000 you would be able to finance for 7 years instead of just 5, which would drop your payment from $7,050 per month to $5,450 per month.

 

In both cases, if you lease you should be able to write off the entire payment as an operating expense, with the option to buy the equipment at the end for 10% of the original price. Another option, is an equipment finance agreement, which costs a little bit more (roughly 8% higher payments) but you would own the equipment at the end for $1.

 

The advantage of leasing over buying – tax treatment. Prior to January 2014 Section 179 of the tax code gave you a huge upfront deduction (up to $500k) when purchasing but that number has been curtailed to just $25,000 for 2014 so leasing is starting to make more sense for most companies.

 

Which Is Better?

 

The choice of Horizontal Machining Center or Vertical Machining Center depends on your business model, and some other things, but hopefully this article has given you something to chew on while making this decision.

 

If you need more information about vertical machining center and horizontal machining center, I recommend that you can visit the website of CNC-TAKANG: www.takangcnc.com. The company provides a variety of machine tools for you. Learn more details, please do not hesitate to contact with CNC-TAKANG.

 

 

Article Source: https://www.smarterfinanceusa.com/blog/vmc-vs-hmc

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HMCs – Machining On Five Axes

Modern commercial machining can be accomplished in a variety of ways. Simple jobs, such as perpendicular drilling, can still be processed with a manually operated machine. Even a fairly complicated component can be produced with the primitive computerized numerical control (CNC) machine tools of the 1980s.

 

Some Modern engineers and designers, however, are constantly pushing the machining envelop by imagining ever more complex designs. The components described by these complex designs often require a 5-axis CNC horizontal machining center (HMC) in order to be performed to the proper tolerances.

 

What is a 5-axis CNC horizontal machining center? It is a state-of-the-art computer-controlled milling machine. Actually, its name alone does a fairly decent job of describing its major attributes. Horizontal refers to the orientation of the main spindle. Vertical machining centers do exist and, although less expensive, are sometimes considered inferior in precision and capability.

 

The 5-axis refers to the ability of the machine to physically manipulate the component and of the cutting head. The X, Y and Z axes are the normal axes familiar to everyone: up and down, side-to-side and rotational movement. In addition, movement along a C-axis is asymmetric and allows for eccentric turning. Lastly, the B-axis allows for the tilting of the machining head itself. Computer control of these movements allows for the creation of almost any shape.

 

CNC refers to the computerized numerical control of the machine. A computer controls all aspects of the process. It rotates the component on the five axes, controls the depth of cuts and bores and automatically determines the correct tool necessary. This last feature is accomplished through the use of a magazine that houses a wide variety of tools. A typical magazine will hold a drill, lathe, plane, screw tap, gear shaper and many other dies.

 

The Rigid construction of the device is another key feature that allows it to produce the most complicated components within the specified tolerances. But without the proper materials and bracing, the entire machine would flex and ruin the accuracy of the tooling.

 

All of these features allow for the production of components to a tolerance of 1/10,000 of an inch while maintaining greater efficiency and productivity.

 

Horizontal machining centers are feats of engineering and they are interesting to witness in action. It takes the skill of a human to imagine and create the programming that allows these wonders to do their work.

 

SIGMA CNC Technology Machinery Co., Ltd. is the professional manufacturer of horizontal machining centers and grinding machines. If you are interested in learning further details about SIGMA’s machinery, please feel free to visit our website or contact with us directly!

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6703266

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Machining Center and Turning Lathe- Victor Taichung

Victor Taichung was founded in 1954 as a manufacturer of machining center and turning lathe. The machine series includes multitasking turning center, horizontal turning lathe, vertical turning lathe, horizontal machining center, vertical machining center, wheel machinery and turnkey. Insisting on technology innovation and quality superiority, the company is continuously devoted to developing new generation of machine tools. The machine center features high speed on axis rapid feed and tool changeover, high performance by bulit-in-spindle, high efficiency by rotary style APC and oversized linear guide ways. On the other hand, the turning lathe features compact space floor requirement, ergonomic design for easy loading and unloading, integral chip disposal without coolant leakage, and high roundess and surface finish. Victor Taichung keeps on designing and developing the latest machining centers and turning lathes to meet your highest level of needs.

 

Horizontal Turning Lathe

Horizontal Turning Lathe

 

 

Vertical Machining Center

Vertical Machining Center

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